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3 Misconceptions About Student Accident Insurance

Accidents occur regularly at schools all over the country. For this unfortunate reason, it is important to take the necessary precautions that will ensure your school is protected if an unexpected accident occurs. There are numerous misconceptions about student accident insurance policies, and we are here to set the record straight:

#1 I Don’t Need Insurance

You cannot predict when an injury will occur,

Why is this Coverage Needed and Who Pays for it?

The Student Accident Program is designed for schools, parents, and students. All three benefit from this essential coverage by offering protection against costs associated with accidents. Whether you have coverage or not, there is a cost to pay.

Let’s look at the value of this program by first looking at the need:

Accidents occur at school and always have.

Are Students Covered on a Field Trip?

The Student Accident Program generally extends coverage for eligible benefits on field trips that are:

1.  School Sanctioned 

A sanctioned trip must be one that has the school’s permission or approval. A school would not want to extend their liability for an event that fell outside of their control.

2. 

Benefits to Parents and Students

We have talked about the benefits of the Student Accident Program to the school’s budget and how important it is to protect the operating costs, salaries, educational funds, nutrition allowance, and many other vital parts of the school’s finances. Let’s look at the benefits to the parents and children:

  1. Excessive Cost –

Case Study: Reducing the Fear of Medical Costs

“I can’t afford to go to the doctor. Maybe it will get better.”

“We just don’t have the money right now.”

“Maybe we can borrow some money from ___.”

Have you heard anyone say these things before? Have you said them before? Knowing medical care will be expensive may affect the decisions someone makes about seeking treatment.

Success Stories: The Benefits of Additional Coverage

Did you know that the Student Accident
Program
can complement the medical coverage a student may already have?

Case Study Brief

A StudentAccident.net client had a football student who was injured during practice. His forearm break needed immediate attention.

Some of the medical expenses incurred were:

  • Emergency room visit
  • X-rays
  • Forearm Cast
  • Follow-up visits

Even though the parents had major medical for the student,

Boast About Your Student Accident Program

The Student Accident Program is such a valuable benefit to students who attend your school. We see many schools without a well-thought-out risk management plan implemented. Having one in place helps to make your academy stand out as a proactive leader in student safety. Because of this, we suggest the schools promote it as a benefit of their academy.

How to Protect the School from an Expensive Claim

Protecting the school’s budget is the key goal of
the Student Accident Program.

You
hope you never have an accident but having a plan in place is the best way to
protect the school from unexpected injuries. Let’s look at an example from one
of our schools:

A
Christian School in the Midwest participates in different sporting activities
including football and cheerleading.

The Hidden Cost of Student Accidents

The Student Accident Program was designed to benefit our schools, students, and parents. We wanted a program to protect all three from the cost of medical bills and the hidden cost of accident claims that schools sometimes overlook.

What are the known costs?

When a student is injured at school, that injury requires medical care which can range from only a few stitches to casts,

Play it Safe: Playground Safety Tips

Recess is typically the highlight of a child’s school day. It is important to make sure that playgrounds are as safe as they are fun. Here at Student Accident, we want to help your school prepare for anything that could happen on the playground or during any other school-related activity. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) states that each year,

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